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The Hunt for DB Cooper – an interview with retired FBI agent, Ralph Himmelsbach

Just looking at some older Cooper research, here is an interesting interview with Ralph Himmelsbach, one of the FBI agents most associated with the case.

The Mountain News - WA

  

On January 30, 2011, I interviewed Ralph Himmelsbach, the now-retired FBI agent who had been the lead agent for the Bureau’s Portland, Oregon office in the DB Cooper case.  Mr. Himmelsbach, a career FBI agent, served as Portland’s lead Cooper investigator from the time of the skyjacking on November 24, 1971 until his retirement from the Bureau in April, 1980.

Ralph is very easy to find, suggesting that he is comfortable with his public persona., and in addition he has a book for sale on the skyjacking titled, NORJAK: the Investigation of DB Cooper.

View original post 2,457 more words

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DB Cooper – Cooperites celebrate the 47th Anniversary of the skyjacking with conference

Detailed report on the DB Cooper Forum last week in Portland:

The Mountain News - WA

By Bruce A. Smith

The 47th Anniversary of the DB Cooper skyjacking was celebrated with a gathering of experts and aficionados to discuss the details of the case, and ponder new evidence and suspects.

On November 24, 1971, DB Cooper hijacked a Northwest Orient 727 enroute to Seattle from Portland, and after he jumped from the aft stairs with $200,000 in twenties tethered to his waist, nothing has ever been discovered – neither his identity, fate, or any of his gear or booty. However, $6,200 of ransom money was found on a Columbia River beach in 1980, but that discovery also defies explanation. DB Cooper’s daring-do has been feted every since, and this anniversary was no exception. The DB Cooper heist, known to law enforcement as NORJAK, remains the only unsolved skyjacking in American history. Nevertheless, the FBI officially closed the case in 2016.

Approximately 100 people gathered Saturday…

View original post 2,714 more words

DB Cooper and the flap over Walter R. Reca – an interview with publisher Vern Jones

The Walter Reca story is, bluntly, pure nonsense. Bruce points out many of the problems in this write-up.

The Mountain News - WA

By Bruce A. Smith

Vern Jones and his Principia Media publishing company have just released a book that claims to identify the iconic skyjacker DB Cooper. DB Cooper and Me: A Criminal, a Spy, My Best Friend, is a memoir penned by an 84-year old Floridian named Carl “Charley” Laurin, and it traces the alleged exploits of Detroit native, Walter R. “Peca” Reca.

Laurin claims that Reca is DB Cooper.

View original post 1,729 more words

Media Alert

I will be on After Hours AM talking DB Cooper at 7:10pm PST on February 28th.

http://www.americas-most-haunted.com/after-hours-am/

  • An archive of my posts relating to the Cooper Case can be Found Here
  • You can buy my book on DB Cooper Here.
  • Here is a list of people I’m researching to find a possible connection to the Max Gunther book. (List was downloaded from FamilySearch.org, it is all the Canadian-born US Army WWII enlistees.) Any information on any of the people on the list would be helpful.
  • My Data on no-pulls during WWII and in skydiving.

Twitter: @martyandrade

Update: Podcast is up, my interview begins in the second hour.

DB Cooper news: Interview with author Martin Andrade

My interview with Bruce Smith, more thoughts later.

The Mountain News - WA

By Bruce A. Smith

With the 46th Anniversary of DB Cooper’s skyjacking approaching us – Cooper hijacked his Northwest Orient jetliner on the evening before Thanksgiving in 1971 – it is certainly timely to discuss this iconic crime with another DB Cooper author, Martin Andrade, Jr.

View original post 1,445 more words

New Book: Finding DB Cooper

finding db

Now Available on Kindle

Cooper Podcast

I got my name butchered in a podcast:

In 1971, D. B. Cooper hijacked a plane and made off with $200,000 worth of random money. He was never seen again. In today’s episode Jack and J. J. dissect all the details of the case.…

Source: Ep. 42: D. B. Cooper

It’s a fun podcast, they deliver some criticism of my (and Tom Kaye’s) work on the tie. I admit, we’re shooting from the hip on quantifying this stuff. The reason I feel the need to try to connect Cooper to the tie probabilistically is because everything, every piece of evidence in this case, is challenged. Many of the researchers on the Cooper Forum suggest the tie wasn’t Cooper’s. I think is a very wrong assumption. Common sense suggests the tie belonged to Cooper, trying to connect it to him the way I did in my Math Tie post may have been a futile endeavor.

The two ladies also ridicule my attempt to infer future criminality, or the lack thereof, from someone’s reading habits (cf: Dick Lepsy). I still have a hard time believing Lepsy went from philosophy-reading grocery store manager and family man into a plane hijacker, but I’m adjusting my profile of Lepsy in the response to the criticism.

Definitely give the podcast a listen.

Personal Update

I’m approaching the end of my series on the D.B Cooper hijacking. I have a few more suspect profiles to finish, then that will be it. I am currently editing a book on the Cooper hijacking, I hope to have it ready sometime in the fall of this year.

If there is anything you wish to ask of me about the Cooper case, or something you wanted me to comment on, or something I might have missed, or any other grievance about this case to air out, please comment on this post or send me a message through the Contact Page.

Cooper-Related Jump Data

Stored Here

2015 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 3,500 times in 2015. If it were a cable car, it would take about 58 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.