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Not DB Cooper: List, Mayfield and LDC

John List

Some may remember List as the man who murdered his entire family in order to guarantee their place in Heaven and disappeared for almost 18 years before America’s Most Wanted caught him using an age-progressed model of his face. He was also considered a Cooper suspect since he matched the description and disappeared two weeks before the hijacking. However, he already had $200,000 from draining his family’s bank accounts, he didn’t need to steal more money, at least right away. Further, his career as an accountant doesn’t match the particles found on the tie, he does not have any kind of parachuting background and he did not have the knowledge or skills to pull off this heist, certainly not under such a tight schedule. After his capture, he readily admitted to the murders of his family, but denied being the hijacker..

Ted Mayfield

Mayfield is well-known in the Cooper saga. A skydiver and pilot who had several run-ins with the law, fingers pointed to him almost immediately after Norjak. He was even acquainted with Ralph Himmelsbach before the hijacking. Certainly, Mayfield had the skills and probably had the moxie to pull off such a stunt. However, Mayfield contacted the FBI on the evening of the hijacking, only a few hours after Cooper jumped from the plane. It would have been very difficult for even a competitive skydiver like Mayfield to cover his tracks so quickly. Most importantly, Mayfield is known to be of very short stature, about five feet three inches tall, and thus he does not fit the description of the hijacker.

LD Cooper

The story of LD Cooper exploded on the media and disappeared just as quickly. Marla Cooper reported her uncle Lynn Doyle Cooper as a DB Cooper suspect to both the FBI and media circles, and this included claims that the story was so convincing that the FBI might even close the book on Dan Cooper. Lynn Doyle was a surveyor in Washington state who served in the Korean War, his brother once worked for Boeing and might have picked up knowledge about the 727 there. The two thus might have conspired to commit the hijacking, resulting in Marla’s memories of LD being injured around the time of Thanksgiving in 1971. However, no physical evidence ties LD to the hijacking, and he did not work in one of those fields that would have been exposed to unalloyed titanium like the particles found on Cooper’s tie. Also, a DNA test failed to produce a match between LD Cooper and the DNA profiles found on the tie. Supposedly a movie is in the works, or a book, or something. There’s simply not much to investigate. Lynn Doyle Cooper is not our Hijacker.

2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here's an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 5,200 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Ten Years!


Seriously. And it only took a decade to do it.

Photo Credit: http://www.varight.com/weasels/watchers-council-nominations-10-year-anniversary-edition/

Theater Owners Ask Movie Studios To Keep Trailers To Just Two Minutes

Originally posted on Consumerist:

It used to be that movie trailers were no more than 30 seconds or a minute in length. In recent years, many sneak previews for upcoming movies have stretched to two-and-a-half minutes. That’s fine if it’s just for one, highly anticipated movie, but when a theater runs several long trailers in a row, it pushes a film’s start time (and moviegoers’ patience) to the limit.

View original 289 more words

5 Things People Do On Tax Returns That Can Lead To IRS Audits

Originally posted on Consumerist:

Can you smell it in the air? That’s the distinct scent of Tax Season approaching. So in these days leading up to everyone’s favorite time of year, here are some reminders about the red flags the IRS looks for when deciding whether to audit a taxpayer.

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3 Lessons We Learned About The Produce Section That Will Change Your Next Grocery Trip

Originally posted on Consumerist:

We all know there’s a grand design in place at the supermarket, with every detail planned and planted specifically to solicit the ultimate reaction: “I’ve gotta buy this.” It’s no different in the microcosm of the produce section, says a 30-year-veteran of A&P supermarkets, and the amount of thought that goes into convincing shoppers we want — nay, need! — to buy something will change the way you look at fruits and veggies.

View original 566 more words

Make Everyone Smile With Instant Camera Cheese Slicer

Originally posted on Consumerist:

gamago_saycheese3Sure, you could get a cheese slicer with a metal handle. You could slice your cheese with a knife. Or you could make the phrase “say cheese” literal with a novelty cheese slicer shaped like an instant camera.

View original 69 more words

Random Link


Walmart Laying Off 2,300 Sam’s Club Workers

Marty Andrade:

Whoa. January is normally bad for retail, but I wonder if there’s a larger economic trend here.

Originally posted on Consumerist:

In a move intended to thin the herd of too many assistant managers, Walmart announced over the weekend that it will be laying off 2,300 employees of its Sam’s Club warehouse stores, and that about half of those being let go are salaried assistant managers.

View original 249 more words

Your Eyes Do Not Deceive You: USPS Price Hike Brings Cost Of A First-Class Stamp To $0.49

Originally posted on Consumerist:

Remember when it only cost a quarter to instantly get in touch with someone from a payphone? Then we all got nostalgic when the price started creeping up, until cell phones made that fond remembrance less of misty, water-colored memory. Now it costs almost two quarters to send a less-than-instant letter or card, with the new price of first-class stamps rising from $0.46 to $0.49. Kick in, nostalgia!

View original 181 more words


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