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New Book: Finding DB Cooper

finding db

Now Available on Kindle

Cooper Podcast

I got my name butchered in a podcast:

In 1971, D. B. Cooper hijacked a plane and made off with $200,000 worth of random money. He was never seen again. In today’s episode Jack and J. J. dissect all the details of the case.…

Source: Ep. 42: D. B. Cooper

It’s a fun podcast, they deliver some criticism of my (and Tom Kaye’s) work on the tie. I admit, we’re shooting from the hip on quantifying this stuff. The reason I feel the need to try to connect Cooper to the tie probabilistically is because everything, every piece of evidence in this case, is challenged. Many of the researchers on the Cooper Forum suggest the tie wasn’t Cooper’s. I think is a very wrong assumption. Common sense suggests the tie belonged to Cooper, trying to connect it to him the way I did in my Math Tie post may have been a futile endeavor.

The two ladies also ridicule my attempt to infer future criminality, or the lack thereof, from someone’s reading habits (cf: Dick Lepsy). I still have a hard time believing Lepsy went from philosophy-reading grocery store manager and family man into a plane hijacker, but I’m adjusting my profile of Lepsy in the response to the criticism.

Definitely give the podcast a listen.

Personal Update

I’m approaching the end of my series on the D.B Cooper hijacking. I have a few more suspect profiles to finish, then that will be it. I am currently editing a book on the Cooper hijacking, I hope to have it ready sometime in the fall of this year.

If there is anything you wish to ask of me about the Cooper case, or something you wanted me to comment on, or something I might have missed, or any other grievance about this case to air out, please comment on this post or send me a message through the Contact Page.

Cooper-Related Jump Data

Stored Here

2015 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 3,500 times in 2015. If it were a cable car, it would take about 58 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Not DB Cooper: List, Mayfield and LDC

John List

Some may remember List as the man who murdered his entire family in order to guarantee their place in Heaven and disappeared for almost 18 years before America’s Most Wanted caught him using an age-progressed model of his face. He was also considered a Cooper suspect since he matched the description and disappeared two weeks before the hijacking. However, he already had $200,000 from draining his family’s bank accounts, he didn’t need to steal more money, at least right away. Further, his career as an accountant doesn’t match the particles found on the tie, he does not have any kind of parachuting background and he did not have the knowledge or skills to pull off this heist, certainly not under such a tight schedule. After his capture, he readily admitted to the murders of his family, but denied being the hijacker..

Ted Mayfield

Mayfield is well-known in the Cooper saga. A skydiver and pilot who had several run-ins with the law, fingers pointed to him almost immediately after Norjak. He was even acquainted with Ralph Himmelsbach before the hijacking. Certainly, Mayfield had the skills and probably had the moxie to pull off such a stunt. However, Mayfield contacted the FBI on the evening of the hijacking, only a few hours after Cooper jumped from the plane. It would have been very difficult for even a competitive skydiver like Mayfield to cover his tracks so quickly. Most importantly, Mayfield is known to be of very short stature, about five feet three inches tall, and thus he does not fit the description of the hijacker.

LD Cooper

The story of LD Cooper exploded on the media and disappeared just as quickly. Marla Cooper reported her uncle Lynn Doyle Cooper as a DB Cooper suspect to both the FBI and media circles, and this included claims that the story was so convincing that the FBI might even close the book on Dan Cooper. Lynn Doyle was a surveyor in Washington state who served in the Korean War, his brother once worked for Boeing and might have picked up knowledge about the 727 there. The two thus might have conspired to commit the hijacking, resulting in Marla’s memories of LD being injured around the time of Thanksgiving in 1971. However, no physical evidence ties LD to the hijacking, and he did not work in one of those fields that would have been exposed to unalloyed titanium like the particles found on Cooper’s tie. Also, a DNA test failed to produce a match between LD Cooper and the DNA profiles found on the tie. Supposedly a movie is in the works, or a book, or something. There’s simply not much to investigate. Lynn Doyle Cooper is not our Hijacker.

2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here's an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 5,200 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Ten Years!

10years

Seriously. And it only took a decade to do it.

Photo Credit: http://www.varight.com/weasels/watchers-council-nominations-10-year-anniversary-edition/

Theater Owners Ask Movie Studios To Keep Trailers To Just Two Minutes

Consumerist

It used to be that movie trailers were no more than 30 seconds or a minute in length. In recent years, many sneak previews for upcoming movies have stretched to two-and-a-half minutes. That’s fine if it’s just for one, highly anticipated movie, but when a theater runs several long trailers in a row, it pushes a film’s start time (and moviegoers’ patience) to the limit.

View original post 289 more words

5 Things People Do On Tax Returns That Can Lead To IRS Audits

Consumerist

Can you smell it in the air? That’s the distinct scent of Tax Season approaching. So in these days leading up to everyone’s favorite time of year, here are some reminders about the red flags the IRS looks for when deciding whether to audit a taxpayer.

View original post 327 more words