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From the Notebook

-Another MBA class down, just a few more to go. My final grade isn’t in quite yet, but assuming I got at least a 33% on the final test, I’ll have at least a “B” in the class. (Update: got an “A”) I’d prefer to Ace out from here, but it won’t really matter. I’ll graduate with honors either way (if I graduate). Because of an early “B” in the teamwork class, I won’t get the chance to graduate with highest honors.

-MBA progression: For those of you keeping track, I have three more “courses” left in the MBA program. Currently I’m taking a course on strategic management. Then I have two courses related to my final project (either a business plan or a thesis). Six weeks gets me through the strategic management course. Then 24 more weeks of work on the major project. Light?…tunnel? Not sure.

-Finished up Thomas Sowell’s “Economic Facts and Fallacies”. The book takes on taboo topics including gender and racial issues (as they pertain to economic and public policy matters). Sowell brings his detached interest in truth and stunningly brilliant ability to interpret complex statistics and data into a tight 200 page book. He destroys many sacred cows of the left, including the idea of a “glass ceiling” for women in business and the theory economic development money sent to third world countries is beneficial. This book is a must for anyone interested in economic and public policy issues.

-Read “Winged Victory” by VM Yeates. It’s a semi-autobiographical novel about the air war over France in WWI written by an ace in the Royal Flying Corps (later the RAF). Outside of long tracks of pseudo-socialist blatherings (the author clearly took a Marxist view of WWI) in the form of discussions between fellow pilots, the book is a profound representation of the air war. True to history with few artistic allowances, Yeates presents a very unwashed and unromantic view of an ignoble war. Highly recommended.

The September Campaign

It’s the 70th anniversary of the Nazi invasion of Poland. I was originally hoping to write a series of posts on the invasion, but life and grad school got in the way. Instead I point you all to Mitch Berg’s excellent piece on the subject.

But, Mitch only scratches the surface. So, I’m requiring all of you to read up on the Invasion of Poland and admire the extreme bravery and tenacity of the Polish people.

(And I’ll point to some specific people to help out: There was a general who never never lost an engagement until his army ran out of ammo. There was the CIC of the Polish Armed Forces who, after escaping the ruins of Poland with his life, smuggled himself back into occupied Poland to help with the resistance. And there were the guys in the Modlin Fortress who held out for over two weeks until they were basically defending a pile of rocks with nothing but rocks.)

From the Notebook

-Spent some time talking with people about Collin Peterson’s remarks about townhalls. The reactions were all negative. The complaints focused not on Peterson calling the district 25% “truther,” but on the fact Peterson didn’t like doing townhalls. Seems even a popular representative should spend time listening to their district. Even when half the district has below average intelligence (imagine a politician saying that about their district).

-Finished “The Lone Survivor” by Marcus Luttrell. It’s Luttrell’s story of becoming a navy SEAL and surviving a dangerous encounter with terrorists in Afghanistan (an encounter which killed the other three members of his four-man SEAL team). It’s a great book and I can’t recommend it enough. Lt. Mike Murphy, the leader of Luttrell’s SEAL team (SEAL Team 10), was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

-This class has me packing in a lot of material in a very short period of time so I’m being kept busy. But, I’m producing regular material over at the Bleacher Report.

-Finished “The Book: Playing the percentages in baseball” by Tom Tango et al. It’s a book for baseball managers and GMs to understand strategies for squeezing a few extra wins out of a season using statistical analysis and game theory. This is one of the few baseball strategy books to talk about game theory and this fact alone should make it necessary reading for baseball fans.

Wednesday Hero

Gen. Ann E. DunwoodyGen. Ann E. Dunwoody
55 years old from Fort Belvoir, Virginia
U.S. Army

Call it breaking the brass ceiling. Ann E. Dunwoody, after 33 years in the Army, ascended Friday to a peak never before reached by a woman in the U.S. military: four-star general.

At an emotional promotion ceremony, Dunwoody looked back on her years in uniform, said it was a credit to the Army—and a great surprise to her—that she would make history in a male-dominated military.

“Thirty-three years after I took the oath as a second lieutenant, I have to tell you this is not exactly how I envisioned my life unfolding,” she told a standing-room-only auditorium. “Even as a young kid, all I ever wanted to do was teach physical education and raise a family.

“It was clear to me that my Army experience was just going to be a two-year detour en route to my fitness profession,” she added. “So when asked, `Ann, did you ever think you were going to be a general officer, to say nothing about a four-star?’ I say, `Not in my wildest dreams.’

“There is no one more surprised than I—except, of course, my husband. You know what they say, `Behind every successful woman there is an astonished man.'”

You can read the rest of Gen. Dunwoody’s story here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.
We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Hero Was Suggested By Toni

1st LT. Frank B. Walkup, IV1st LT. Frank B. Walkup, IV
23 years old from Woodbury, Tennessee
2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division
June 16, 2007
U.S. Army

Toni already has a great post up on her site, so I’ll just link to it.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Wednesday Hero

Spc. Kisha Makerney
Spc. Kisha Makerney
23 years old from Fort Towson, Oklahoma
120th Engineers, Oklahoma Army National Guard
U.S. Army

Spc. Kisha Mackerney isn’t being profiled today because of something she did on the battlefield. She’s being profiled because her spirit and determination. In 2002, Makerney joined the Oklahoma Army National Guard out of a sense of patriotism, because, as she put it, “I love our country and our people.” Between 2004 and 2005, she served in Iraq as a gunner and helped provide battalion security. She returned home in early 2005 and was in a terrible motorcycle accident on June 25, 2005. The front wheel of her brand new bike had blown out and sent her flying into a highway sign. She looked up at her now mangled bike and was angry. That’s when she noticed that her left leg below the knee was missing. The first thing she thought of when she saw her leg was that her military career was over.

Makerney pulled herself out of the ditch that she had landed in and was able to flag down a passing motorist. She was taken a hospital in Hugo, Oklahoma before being flown to Dallas, Texas.

As soon as word spread about her accident, her fellow soldiers, her second family, rallied and rushed to her bedside. “Even before I was out of surgery they were waiting in the halls,” she said.

Continue reading Spc. Kisha Makerney’s story here. There are some despicable comments by a few readers on the story. Just ignore them.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Have Every Right To Dream Heroic Dreams. Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Wednesday Hero

Sgt. Kenneth J. Schall

Sgt. Kenneth J. Schall
22 years old from Peoria, Arizona
2nd Battalion, 70th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Armored Division
May 22, 2005
U.S. Army

“It was very tough not to be touched by him in some way,” said Terri Schall, Sgt. Kenneth Schall’s mother.These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

Kenneth Schall was enrolled at Glendale Community College and was studying to become a history teacher when the country was attacked on September 11, 2001. The event spurred him to join the Army. He served a four and a half month tour in Iraq in 2004 and returned in February of 2005.

Terri Schall last spoke to her son on Mother’s Day in 2005. “He sounded great — tired — but he said he was doing OK”, she said. Sgt. Kenneth Schall died when the Humvee he was riding in was involved in an accident in Yusafiyah, Iraq.

Along with his mother, Sgt. Schall is survived by his father and two younger siblings.

 

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Wednesday Hero


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Lance Cpl. Julie Martinez
U.S.M.C

Lance Cpl. Julie Martinez, a radio operator with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, checks the communication capabilities during a backload of Marines from Combat Logistics Regiment 3 to the USS Essex June 9.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.
We Have Every Right To Dream Heroic Dreams. Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Hero Was Suggested by Mary Ann

Staff Sgt. Jude Voss

Staff Sgt. Jude Voss
1st Battalion, 3d Special Forces Group (Airborne)
U.S. Army

His courage illustrates a combat truth to these veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam: Soldiers aren’t thinking about glory or ideals in the midst of a battle. They fight for the men to the left and right of them.

And that’s just what SSgt. Jude Voss did in September of 2006 when, without consideration to his safety, SSgt. Voss ran through enemy fire and the burning, smoking debris of a truck to rescue Sgt. 1st Class Greg Stube. Sgt. Stube was in a bad way. Uniform burning and legs busted, but because of the actions of SSgt. Voss he is alive today.

Because of his actions that day, SSgt. Voss was nominated for and received the Silver Star Medal for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action. “I did what everybody out there would do” Voss said. “I was just the closest guy.”

You can read SSgt. Voss’s story here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Have Every Right To Dream Heroic Dreams. Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.
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