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links for 2010-11-28

  • Quote:"In the current study, music was used in a “dual-task” paradigm to facilitate performance under pressure. Three “choking-susceptible” experienced female basketball players were purposively sampled from 41 screened players. Participants completed 240 basketball free throws in a single-case A1-B1-A2-B2 design (A phases = “low-pressure” and B phases = “high-pressure”), with the music intervention occurring during the B2 phase. Following completion of the phases, an interview was conducted to examine perceptions of choking and cognitions associated with the effects of the music lyrics. Participants improved performance in the B2 phase, and explained that choking resulted from an increase in public self-awareness (S-A). The music intervention decreased S-A, and enabled participants to minimize explicit monitoring of execution and reduce general distractibility.
  • Quote:"During the other rides, the tempo of the tracks was slowed by 10 percent or increased by 10 percent. The riders were not informed about the tempo manipulations.

    But their riding changed significantly in response. When the tempo slowed, so did their pedaling and their entire affect. Their heart rates fell. Their mileage dropped. They reported that they didn’t like the music much. On the other hand, when the tempo of the songs was upped 10 percent, the men covered more miles in the same period of time, produced more power with each pedal stroke and increased their pedal cadences. Their heart rates rose. They reported enjoying the music — the same music — about 36 percent more than when it was slowed. But, paradoxically, they did not find the workout easier. Their sense of how hard they were working rose 2.4 percent. The up-tempo music didn’t mask the discomfort of the exercise. But it seemed to motivate them to push themselves…

  • Quote:"On average, the participants performed more than twice as well on a verbal fluency test after listening to music while exercising than they did after exercising without the music.

    "When there was no music, there was no change," Emery says.

    Emery chose Vivaldi's "The Four Seasons" for the project because prior research by other scientists with that particular piece indicated that it helped patients with lung disease perform better mentally.

  • Quote:"Personal trainers should be very attuned to the background music playing as their clients workout. Slower, sedative music decreases a person's muscular fitness potential. Many persons may actually prefer a silent atmosphere, where there are no musical distractions, even of a stimulative quality.

    // Interesting stuff. If only my elementary school gym teachers had let us listen to music.

  • Quote:""Once you assume a creator and a plan, it makes us objects, in a cruel experiment, whereby we are created sick, and commanded to be well.

    // Hitchins has it wrong. Atheism makes us objects. Meat machines in a cruel world without spirit, where we play out our materialistic destiny like marionettes.

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