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Here is an interesting article that shows that the 90’s weren’t all that bad as far as climate goes:

http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v432/n7015/full/432289a_fs.html&content_filetype=pdf

or non pdf:

http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v432/n7015/full/432289a_fs.html

“Historical phenology: Grape ripening as a past climate indicator
Summer temperature variations are reconstructed from harvest dates since 1370.
French records of grape-harvest dates in Burgundy were used to reconstruct spring–summer temperatures from 1370 to 2003 using a process-based phenology model developed for the Pinot Noir grape. Our results reveal that temperatures as high as those reached in the 1990s have occurred several times in Burgundy since 1370. However, the summer of 2003 appears to have been extraordinary, with temperatures that were probably higher than in any other year since 1370.
Biological and documentary proxy records have been widely used to reconstruct temperature variations to assess the exceptional character of recent climate fluctuations1-3. Grape-harvest dates, which are tightly related to temperature, have been recorded locally for centuries in many European countries. These dates may therefore provide one of the longest uninterrupted series of regional temperature anomalies (highs and lows) without chronological uncertainties1.
In Burgundy, these officially decreed dates have been carefully registered in parish and municipal archives since at least the early thirteenth century. We used a corrected and updated harvest-date series4 from Burgundy, covering the years from 1370 to 2003, to reconstruct spring–summer temperature anomalies that had occurred in eastern France. To convert historical observations into temperature anomalies, we used a process-based phenology model for Pinot Noir, the main variety of grape that has been continuously grown in Burgundy since at least the fourteenth century”

Fascinating stuff, and according to the Lake Detective, it puts global warming into perspective.

And athiests hate giving trees:
http://www.komo4.com/stories/34416.htm

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